A half-day workshop on
HOW (AND HOW NOT) TO EVALUATE TEACHING

Date : 23rd May 2014 (9.00am – 12.00pm)
Venue : V01 Satellite Building, Seminar Room 3, Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering (FBME), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia Johor Bahru  
Tea Break : Foyer FBME
RM 300 (USD 150) Early Bird
RM 400 (USD 200) Normal

The usual way to evaluate how well a course was taught is to survey the students at the end of the course and compile and average the ratings. If the rating form was carefully designed and validated, this procedure provides unique and important information, but by itself it is not adequate to provide a good comprehensive evaluation of teaching quality. Students are not in a position to judge certain aspects of instruction, such as whether the course learning objectives were appropriate, the content was up-to-date, the instruction followed well-established pedagogical principles, and the instructor had an adequate mastery of the subject. Only peers can do that.
Recognizing this situation, a growing number of institutions have begun to include peer review of teaching in faculty performance evaluations, but here too there are problems. In most peer reviews a faculty member observes a single lecture, notes whatever catches his or her attention, draws conclusions that may reflect questionable preconceptions of what constitutes good teaching, and files a report.  This procedure does not provide a reliable assessment of teaching quality: an observation conducted by a different observer or by the same observer on another day could lead to completely different conclusions.
There are better ways to evaluate teaching. The goals of this workshop are to present methods that have been proved effective and to equip participants to design an evaluation process that meets the needs of their department. The workshop addresses the following questions

  1. How can I get reliable and valid student evaluations of teaching?
  2. How can I get reliable and valid peer ratings of teaching?
  3. How can I evaluate teaching performance comprehensively and effectively?
  4. How can I use evaluations to improve teaching quality (formative evaluation)?


A half-day workshop on
DESIGNING AND PRESENTING EFFECTIVE
TEACHING WORKSHOPS FOR ACADEMIC STAFF IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Date : 23rd May 2014 (2.30 pm – 5.30 pm)
Venue: V01 Satellite Building, Seminar Room 3, Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering (FBME), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia Johor Bahru
Tea Break : Foyer FBME
RM 300 (USD 150) Early Bird
RM 400 (USD 200) Normal

As anyone who has attempted to present a seminar or workshop on teaching to faculty members in science, mathematics, or engineering knows, the participants at such programs may not all be warmly receptive.  Many may believe that subject knowledge is all that is needed to teach effectively, and they are quick to dismiss as irrelevant any material on pedagogy that they cannot immediately connect to their disciplines.
Presenting an effective teaching workshop to academic staff in technical fields requires answering these questions:

  • How can I design and promote a workshop that will attract substantial numbers of participants?
  • How can I select content that is relevant to the learning interests and needs of the participants, especially when those interests and needs may vary and I cannot be sure in advance what they are?
  • What can I do to make the workshop instructive and enjoyable?  How can I get the participants actively involved?  What mistakes should I avoid?
  • What problems might arise before and during the workshop (logistical problems associated with scheduling and registration, time management, difficult participants, equipment failure, etc.)? How should I deal with them?

This workshop provides answers to all of these questions.